Paging Doctor Evil

In a former life I taught high school English and American history in the saddest suburb in all the world.  So this is the craziest thing I’ve heard in a long time:

“The houses have names. Mr. Rumsfeld’s is Mount Misery and is just across Rolles Creek from a house called Mount Pleasant. On four acres, with four bathrooms, five bedrooms and five fireplaces, built in 1804, the Rumsfeld house is just barely visible at the end of a gravel drive.

Thomas M. Crouch, a broker at the Coldwell Banker office in town, says one legend attributes the name to the original owner, said to have been a sad and doleful Englishman. His merrier brother then built a house, and to put him on, Mr. Crouch supposes, named it Mount Pleasant.

But there is some historical gravity to the name, too. By 1833, Mount Misery’s owner was Edward Covey, a farmer notorious for breaking unruly slaves for other farmers. One who wouldn’t be broken was Frederick Douglass, then 16 and later the abolitionist orator. Covey assaulted him, so Douglass beat him up and escaped. Today, where the drive begins, Mount Misery seems a congenial place, with a white mailbox with newspaper delivery sleeves attached, a big American flag fluttering from a post by a split-rail fence and a tall, one-hole birdhouse of the sort made for bluebirds — although the lens in the hole suggests another function.”

The architect of two of America’s biggest foreign policy disasters lives in Mr. Covey’s home.  Maybe the Rumsfelds can rent out a Bavarian flat for a weekend or two to complete the perfect caricature.

That said, why isn’t this home a national monument to the legacy of Frederick Douglass, rather than a war criminal’s weekend mansion?

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